• SCHOLAR SPOTLIGHT - KILLIAN DOHERTY (PHD IN ARCHITECTURE UCL, 2014 TO 2017)

    March 2022 Newsletter

    September 8, 2022

    Killian website image from newsletter

    March 2022 Newsletter

    What impact has the Bonnart Trust had on your life/your studies?

    "The Bonnart Trust provided me with the time and space needed to research, understand and reflect on the various ways in which discrimination works through the built environment. The Trust granted me time and space that allowed me to immerse myself within the life-worlds of indigenous communities forced out of their forests - either side of the 1994 Rwandan Genocide - and who have been forcibly, resettled and rehoused against their will."

    What has inspired you to produce your film called Uppland?

    "The film Uppland was inspired by a series of visits to a modernist new town called Yekepa, in Northern Liberia, a new town designed and built by Swedish American mining firm called LAMCO and that today is run by Arcelor Mittal, the global producer of structural steel. This film also came out of a chance meeting with filmmaker, Edward Lawrenson and Edward and I travelled to Yekepa in 2016, it was here that we met the indigenous communities who live on the margins of the new town and who today continue to be denied equal rights of access to the landscape, to housing and rights to the profits remaining."

    What is your current role? As a former Bonnart Trust scholar, how has it impacted on your current role?

    "I'm currently a lecturer in Architecture and Urbanism at the School of Architecture, within the University of Edinburgh. I teach architectural design studios and deliver seminars that teach students how to critically engage with understandings of the built environment, particularly how development, or new development, produces environmental and social unevenness in our cities. The way in which I teach has been inspired by the Trust and that is to provide a safe space to discuss the experiences of discrimination and to shed light on particular blind spots within architectural education, and the architectural profession more broadly."

    Click here to listen to Killian's audiogram.

  • Race & ethnicity: British South Asian experiences

    December 2021 Newsletter

    September 7, 2022

    Satya Gunput image for newsletter Dec 2021

    December 2021 Newsletter

    Earlier this year, I was invited by the Faculty of History at the University of Cambridge to contribute to the ESRC project 'Secondary Education and Social Change in the United Kingdom since 1945' (SESC). This ensued from an earlier contribution I made to a roundtable at NACBS 2020.

    As part of this project, I recorded a video to be used as a learning resource in schools at the Key Stage 3 level. Using source materials derived from my PhD research, I concentrated on the experience of South Asian children, who were bussed to other schools in West London in the 1970s. I contextualised how race mediated the experience of schooling in 1970s Britain. The videos will be accompanied by a learning resource pack designed by history teacher consultants on the project. All those resources will be available on the SESC website and the Historical Association website.

    My video and others in the project are available to view on the University of Cambridge SESC website.

  • THE HISTORY OF SOCIAL REPRODUCTION

    December 2021 Newsletter

    September 7, 2022

    December 2021 Newsletter

    Aleph Ross is an MA student in Contemporary History and Politics at Birkbeck College, University of London, 2021-2023.

    She currently works part time for a charity supporting unpaid carers and has an interest in the history of social reproduction and attempts to organise groups who perform the hidden or neglected work of care, domestic and sexual labour. She is also curious about the absorption of this work into the welfare state, and the role of feminist groups and trade unions in shaping how gendered labor is performed and paid for.

    Meanwhile, she has developed a growing curiosity in Jewish migration to London in the late 19th and early 20th centuries and is eager to explore the points of overlap between this period of history and the feminist and gender histories with which she is most familiar (e.g.moral panics about the trafficking of migrant Jewish women in the East End). One day a week, she also works as a cheesemonger in an outdoor market and is involved in organising with the community union ACORN.

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  • CHALLENGING EUROCENTRIC FRAMEWORKS

    December 2021 Newsletter

    September 7, 2022

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    December 2021 Newsletter

    Rebecca (Bex) Shorunke is an MA student in Culture, Diaspora and Ethnicity at Birkbeck College, University of London. She has just begun her studies and is interested in challenging the Eurocentric frameworks through which we have been taught to regard history, and exploring the contributions of discourses and movements, including coloniality, Enlightenment, Eugenics and fascism, in determining what we now regard as ‘race’.

    She is also interested in exploring the relationship between sex and race. This will help her gain a deeper understanding into queer theory and the interactions between race, sexuality, gender, disability and class with the criminal justice system and wider society. And within that, the merging of race and sex to create ethnosexual borders that include and exclude certain groups to create patterns of hypersegregation around the world.

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  • HOW IS 'RACE' MADE BY US TODAY?

    December 2021 Newsletter

    September 7, 2022

    Annie Headshot

    December 2021 Newsletter

    Annie Olaloku-Teriba is starting a PhD in Psychosocial Studies at Birkbeck College, University of London. Her research is driven by two very simple questions: How is ‘race’ made by us today? And how, in turn, does ‘race’ make us?

    She is particularly interested in constructing a conceptual history of ‘blackness’, tracing how our thinking about this category has changed in the last sixty years and the different social worlds that various approaches to ‘blackness’ imply. She investigates how the languages of race available to us are shaped by the specific material conditions of our society, and then in turn, how these languages of race shape not just how we think about race – but what possibilities there are to liberate ourselves from it. She is passionate about finding ways to make liberatory thought accessible to all.

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